A Happy 4th of July for Pets


The Fourth of July celebration is one of the most popular holidays in the United States. Families and friends gather for cookouts, parades, fun and fireworks. For the safety of all creatures, great and small, we’d like to share the following press release from the Humane Society in hopes of keeping more furry friends safe and secure this Independence Day.

Tips for a Safe Fourth of July for Your Pets

Make the holiday happy and safe for the whole family

Everybody loves a holiday, but our beloved pets can become distressed by the additional noise and commotion involved with Independence Day.

In fact, animal shelters across the country are accustomed to receiving “July 4th” dogs—dogs who run off during fireworks celebrations and are rescued by animal control officers or good Samaritans who take them to the safety of a local shelter.

“Pets are family members, and it’s understandable that people want to include them in their holiday plans,” said Adam Goldfarb, director of the Pets at Risk program for The HSUS. “However, most pets will be more comfortable staying at home. Spare our furry friends the stress of fireworks, crowds and fanfare on the Fourth of July, and for everyone, we wish you a safe and fun Independence Day.”

Fortunately, you can prevent pet problems on Independence Day simply by planning ahead and taking some basic precautions:

Leave them at home
There are many family and group activities that are perfect for pets, but a public fireworks display or a picnic, cookout or any other type of gathering where fireworks will be set off isn’t one of them – please resist the urge to take your pets to such an event.

Don’t leave your pet in the car
With only hot air to breathe inside a car, your pet can suffer serious health effects—even death—in a few short minutes. Partially opened windows do not provide sufficient air, but they do provide an opportunity for your pet to be stolen.

Give them shelter
Keep your pets indoors at home in a sheltered, quiet area. Some animals can become destructive when frightened, so be sure that you’ve removed any items that your pet could destroy or that would be harmful to your pet if chewed. Leave a television or radio playing at normal volume to keep him company while you’re attending Fourth of July picnics, parades, and other celebrations.

Keep it quiet
If you know that your pet is seriously distressed by loud noises like thunder, consult with your veterinarian before July 4th for ways to help alleviate the fear and anxiety he or she will experience during fireworks displays. The HSUS has calming products for sale at its online store, Humane Domain.

Pay attention
Never leave pets outside unattended, even in a fenced yard or on a chain. In their fear, pets who normally wouldn’t leave the yard may escape and become lost, or become entangled in their chain, risking injury or death.

Tag ‘Em
Make sure your pets are wearing identification tags so that if they do become lost, they can be returned promptly. Animals found running at-large should be taken to the local animal shelter, where they will have the best chance of being reunited with their owners.

The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest animal protection organization, backed by 11 million Americans. We work to reduce suffering and improve the lives of all animals by advocating for better laws; investigating animal cruelty?; conducting campaigns to reform industries; performing animal rescue and emergency response; and providing care to animals through our sanctuaries, emergency shelters, wildlife rehabilitation centers, and clinics.

Naturally Calming . . .
To help alleviate the fear and anxiety your pet may experience tonight, consider Rescue Remedyicon (a natural remedy found at health food stores) or a Thundershirt (a garment which provides gentle, constant pressure to the body).

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Wishing you and your furry friends a happy and safe
4th of July!


About Author

Devoted pet owner and now, devoted pet editor, Judi spent her time working in traditional offices, keeping the books and the day-to-day operations organized. Taking her dog to work every day for over a decade never seemed odd. Neither did having an office cat. She knows what it's like to train a new puppy and she's experienced the heartache of losing beloved companions.


  1. Thanks for the tips! It’s odd how my friend’s dog which is a big pitbull is deadly scared of fireworks just this year as opposed to all of the years that he’s heard fireworks. Do you have some input why this can happen?

  2. Very helpful tips not only for the 4th but also during severe weather. I hope people will pay attention and kept their pets safe.

  3. Thank you for posting these great tips. I adopted a dog with many problems including a fear of thunder and loud noises. I found a company called Spoiling Pets for You on the web and they sell Thundershirts for $34.00. I ordered one and was amazed how well it worked with keeping him calm during the fireworks and thunderstorms.

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